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THEN AND NOW, 21 BIRDS, FROM BABIES TO ADULTS

LET’S FACE IT, THE WORLD WIDE WEB ABOUNDS WITH CUTE ANIMAL PICS. BUT THERE ARE FEW PICS OF BABY BIRDS.

With the exception of Ducks, Chickens, Geese, and Swans, baby bird’s journies from babies to adults tend to include going through some awkward phases. For the most part featherless, to most humans, they are less than cute. Hence the tale of the Ugly Duckling.

It can take a few months for an almost featherless chick to grow into a beautiful, majestic, not to mention functional bird. Meanwhile, much like human babies, newborn baby chicks are almost completely helpless.

Scroll down to see the then and now shots of 20 species of birds, we bet you didn’t know what all of them looked like as babies.

CARDINAL

Photo Courtesy of pixabay and pxhere

If you are lucky enough to live in North America you will be familiar with seeing a red Cardinal outside your window. Standing out even more at wintertime, the red cardinal has been designated the state bird of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, and Virginia, including West Virginia.

PEACOCK

Photo Courtesy of piqsels andtambako.

Ok, so this species can be a little confusing as only the males are known as peacocks, while the females are called peahens.

Related Reading:

The top 20 winter bird pics of all time.

After setting up a bird feeder, the shots she captured were quite simply beyond stunning!

Then when you combine everyone together they are all called peafowl!

TUFTED PUFFIN

Photo Courtesy of wikipedia

Puffins seem to make a point of wanting to look their best in their breeding season. This is the only time their feet turn orange and for us the time to catch pics of them looking their best.

BARN OWL

Photo Courtesy of portableportraits

Contrary to popular belief not all owls hoot. take the barn owl or instance, it actually screeches.

GREY CROWNED CRANE

Courtesy of goodfreephotos,wikimedia

More flashy than some other members of the Crane family, the Grey-crowned cane is also the national bird of Uganda.

TOCO TOUCAN

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia

Along with being one of its best features, a toucans bill may make many predators think twice about taking one on! However, it is so light and delicate it’s not really that useful for self-defense.

CHICKEN

Photo Courtesy of pxhere,pxfuel

Unlike many bird species, chickens are born cute and fluffy. However, this does not come about without hard work by Mom. She turns the egg at least 50 times a day so her chickens remain in the center of the egg and are born normally. So dedicated, she does this is every day for 21 days.

GOFFIN’S COCKATOO

Photo Courtesy of robandstephanielevy,needpix

If you want a cockatoo as a pet, remember to have a dustpan handy. Many new owners quickly find out that these birds produce a dust to keep their feathers clean and tidy. Great for the cockatoo, not so great for the bird owner’s house.

PEREGRINE FALCON

Courtesy of Patrick Cashin,cuatrok77

Falcons can be trained to be bird security guards and keep other birds away from places where they could cause trouble, like landfills or vineyards.

CHAFFINCH

Photo Courtesy of maxpixels,pixabay

Chaffinches are some of the most common singing birds, but maybe “singing” isn’t the right word, as they actually have at least 9 calls with consistent and discrete meanings.

BLEEDING-HEART PIDGEON

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia

Pigeons stay safely hidden away until they’re at least 40 days old, and then they come out with a shiny coat of feathers just like their parents. Good for them, it looks like it’s less embarrassing that way.

HOUSE MARTIN

Photo Courtesy of milkyfactory,wildreturn

HUMMINGBIRD

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia

Most of hummingbirds’ functions happen too quickly for humans to even perceive: their wings flap at least 50 times per second, their heart rate is about 20 beats per second, and they can stick out and withdraw their tongues 20 times per second while feeding.

PILEATED WOODPECKER

Photo Courtesy of theowlshowofficial,Wikipedia

Woodpeckers’ disproportionately long tongues wrap around the skull, like a tape measure.

GOLDEN PHEASANT

Photo Courtesy of needpix,cuatrok77

Golden pheasants are native to the forests of China, but they’ve been imported and formed feral populations on every continent but Antarctica, because everyone wants some golden pheasants, I guess.

GANNET

Photo Courtesy of flickr,wikimedia

OSTRICH

Photo Courtesy of pixabay,pxfuel

TIT

Photo Courtesy of wikimedia,pxfuel

SWAN

Photo Courtesy of Chris Isherwood,k yamada

RAVEN

Photo Courtesy of wikipedia,pxfuel

BALD EAGLE

Photo Courtesy of wikipedia,needpixReport
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